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Yasiel Puig Is Nothing More Than A Spoiled Child

Yasiel Puig Is Nothing More Than A Spoiled Child

I give Yasiel Puig all my admiration for surviving in Cuba, making a life for himself in Mexico and gaining residence to become a major league ballplayer.

The kid can play, and play without a care in the world.

But, his short life in the U.S. has turned him into a spoiled kid.

We all know what I’m talking about.

That kid, no matter the age, that is never happy with his birthday, Christmas, Hanukkah, or whatever national holiday you observe, gift.

If he gets a toy bike, he wanted a motorized one.

If he gets a large car set, he wanted the larger one.

And heaven help it if he gets socks or other clothes.

The Dodgers made an incredible offer to Puig to secure him, giving him $42 million over seven years. Chump change in this day and age of $100 million deals, but an incredible wealth of money for someone as young as Puig.

On June 3, the 22-year-old made his debut and he has quickly ascended to the ranks of an all-star – despite not making it to the actual game.

 

Fans love him for his incredible cannon.

They love him for his willingness to run out would-be outs and try to score from second on infield hits.

His manager, organization and even a few teammates can’t stand him.

 

Since Puig’s arrival, Los Angeles has moved right to the forefront of National League contenders. Not just division contenders. Or playoff contenders; World Series contenders.

Whether that’s all because of Puig or not is hard to say; but, his spark has provided an incredible amount of impact.

His tardiness, lack of listening skills and other issues have caused a rift in the locker room.

Credit Don Mattingly, manager of the Dodgers, for taking a stance.

Earlier this week, Mattingly benched Puig for being late. He fined him and he even replaced him during a crucial game.

 

Fans love him for his incredible cannon.

They love him for his willingness to run out would-be outs and try to score from second on infield hits.

His manager, organization and even a few teammates can’t stand him.

 

I repeated that because it is becoming more and more clear that some inside the Dodger brain trust don’t feel like they should be relying completely on an unproven kid that doesn’t listen.

Sure, maybe Skip Schumacher really did give the Dodgers a better chance to win.

And removing Clayton Kershaw in the fifth inning for a pinch hitter also helps the bullpen.

Sure.

This is nothing new in the world of baseball, though, as young phenoms like Bryce Harper, Mike Trout and others have all heard complaints from the “old guys.”

In the world of baseball, there is a distinct clash when it comes to the new generation and the old generation. The new ways vs. the old ways. If you have ever seen the movie “Moneyball” you know exactly what I’m talking about.

Nobody likes change for the most part, baseball especially.

Puig will understand, he will come around and eventually, he will be the old veteran calling out some youngster for overthrowing the cut-off man – even though he still made the play.